Between Creeds and Criticism

 
 

 

The Sin of "Grace"

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The evangelical world, broadly speaking, is in turmoil. At least, it should be over the rampant sexual abuse, exploitation and systematic dis-empowerment of women in their churches. In the words of Al Mohler, “judgment has come.”[1] But this is not just a “Southern Baptist” problem. True, the SBC became what it is today through well documented conspiratorial power grabs, eliminating moderate dissent and promoting a male-only view of leadership (what could go wrong?), but they are not alone in the promulgation of their theology and misconduct.   

...We fundamentally misunderstand grace and judgment if we see them as polar opposites or dichotomous. They are not.

...Let’s take a look at how the biblical text describes these religious elites. Certainly they lacked grace for those “outside the circle,” but was their crime really their attempts to be holy? Was their problem really that they just had such high standards and no grace for those who couldn’t be as holy as they were? Not so much.

And the "sinners" are not who you think they are.

Dr. Michael F. Bird, who is Academic Dean and Lecturer in Theology at Ridley College in Australia joins Nick and Allison to discuss Jesus and his view of gender. Mike is a former complementarian who has recently changed his mind on the bible's view of women and we talk about many things in this episode.

Among these things discussed are Jesus and divorce, coffee, Mike's poor taste in drinks, the genderedness of Jesus and soteriology, the issue of sexism and gender dynamics in the classroom, and so on and so forth. It was lively!

Oh, and don't miss his psychotic rant about coffee at the end.

 

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One need not be both Reformed and Complementarian by default. Rather, the presence of Reformed Egalitarians ought to be a primer for the YRR movement to reconsider the cultural link between Reformed theology and patriarchy, and exhibit the spirit of the Reformation.

I want to offer resources to challenge this seemingly common trend of interpretation, as many Reformed theologians are egalitarian and it seems John Piper (among others) has been given a bigger megaphone than others.

 

 

[Insert pretentious quote and/or Bible verse]