Between Creeds and Criticism


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Our goal in life is a relationship with God that begins to transform our relationships now while we look ahead to the complete healing of our bodies and characters in the resurrection. This relationship is with a Triune, relational God Yahweh, who became a human being named Jesus giving us access to God in ways we never had before.

Pursuing relationships (whether human or not) or spiritual experiences as goals in themselves detract from our relationship with God. If we try and reach the "other side" ourselves we open ourselves up to real danger and have no guarantee that who we are talking to is who we think they are. Worst yet, we are opposing the call of God on our lives.

God is near and God is here. We can talk to him and be changed by him in whatever way he decides. Salvation is not far away from any of us.

In this episode multiple exegetical and theological issues within Romans 5 are considered. A surprising formational heart of the passage is revealed (it shouldn't be that surprising) and we cover key ideas often read into the text relating to Adam's "federal headship" and gender. 

We look forward to hearing your thoughts on this one. The reflections came out of a lengthy period of scholarly reflection and meditation on Scripture (this passage and others).

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"… but again, that submission meaning respecting the authority, in other words, a man receives love not by 'sweetie I love you honey honey,' but when he slaps his kill on the table, having a woman who will help him to put his feet up and recharge for the next day because his wife loves him enough to take care of him. That is what is occurring in the Bible, its saying, 'this is clearly how men receive love, which we now know to be true, this is how women receive love…feminists absolutely despise it because they want you to believe that men and women are interchangeable, and men can do anything women can do and women can do anything men can do and it's a general rule there's no difference they can do it with equal or greater efficiency, and its just not true."

This description of Ephesians 5:21-28 sounds like Homer Simpson hermeneutics: where the satisfaction of the man is supreme and the wife is to make sure he is able to relax. This sort of "feet up" mentality may be more conducive to the Stone Age, but it is foreign to the New Testament—as I will demonstrate.


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