Between Creeds and Criticism

 
 

 
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Scholarly interaction with the position of Eve in relation to Christology has tended to relegate Eve to an absent, subordinate or implicit position from the standpoint of the typological significance of Adam. For example, Benjamin Dunning describes Paul’s typology as one that tethers together two men, Adam to Christ. The result is a question framed with the assumption of the presence of only a particularly male representation of salvation with an inadvertent question mark when it comes to where a female body fits in the scheme of salvation. That is, the discussion is approached from the standpoint of the assumed presence of Adam and the “problem” of Eve’s placement as a representation of humanity as whole.

It is my contention that the difficulty of whether a male Christ can represent humanity is an artificial difficulty conceived with a lens that from the start erases “Eve” (i.e. women) and then either mourns or celebrates her absence.

 It is time to begin approaching Christology and gender from a fresh perspective yet without ignoring the historical exclusion of women on the basis of biblical, primarily Pauline, texts.

Boom! In this episode, we (i.e. the Nick) tackles a highly debated text - although we do so with a different edge. While affirming a fairly traditional reading of Romans 1, & we both come to some interesting conclusions that affect the evangelical gender debate - in a good way!

Nick also eats some gross jelly beans, and Allison sips some fireball whiskey while laughing maniacally at him.

Nick will someday avenge his honor and his sweet tooth [no he won't].

Enjoy!

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In reflecting on the recent devastating news about Roy Moore, I have noticed a deep and terrifying tendency for people to make any sort of excuse in order to defend their political candidate. This is not new to any specific side of the political spectrum, as all people are deeply aware of the moral failings of most of the major political players in the United States. And yet, we elect them or hold our nose or make excuses for them.

This is normal.

And normal is not always a good thing.

What is most troubling for me, however, is the desire to excuse and ignore the perversity in our midst as evangelical Christians—as if we will not be judged for our sins.

This is a strong theme in Paul's epistles, especially in relation to Christians.

 

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